The Sports Archives Greatest Moments – Maradona’s Hand of God Goal

Diego Maradona is still considered one of the greatest soccer players in the world, despite a history of misfortune.  With his deceptive style of dribbling and quick bursts of speed, he was able to lead Argentina to World Cup victory in 1986.  His ball-handling with his feet wasn’t the only thing deceptive about his play in the 1986 World Cup.   He scored the first goal in Argentina’s 2-1  quarter-final victory against England in a very deceptive style.  In what looked to be a Maradona header into England’s goal turned out to be ball deflected in by Maradona’s hand.  Replays clearly showed Maradona raising his hand and punching at the ball.  However, the goal stood.

Maradona later described the goal as coming from a little with his head and little with the hand of God.  It wasn’t until 2005 that Maradona confessed that he purposely hit the ball with his hand and immediately knew that it should not have counted.  His second goal that day against England stands out as of the greatest goals in the history of the World Cup, running half-field with the ball at his feet and blowing by five English defenders before putting it home.

After the 1986 World Cup, things turned worse for Maradona as he failed a drug test for the 1994 World Cup and was banished from the tournament.  His drug addiction, alcohol abuse and personal problems would continue until 2005 at which time his deteriorating health forced him to clean up his act.

In 2010, Maradona coached the Argentina National team in the 2010 World Cup losing to Germany in the quarter-finals.

Maradona Hand of God Goal

Maradona Hand of God Goal

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One Response to The Sports Archives Greatest Moments – Maradona’s Hand of God Goal

  1. Pingback: The Sports Archives – 5 Bizarre Sporting Events In History! | The Sports Archives Blog

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