The Sports Archives History Lesson – Tennis Great René “Le Crocodile” Lacoste

René Lacoste is well-known as designer of the shirts with the little crocodile emblem.  Before Lacoste ever dreamed up the crocodile logo, he was playing tennis like a crocodile back in the 1920s and 1930s.  He was known as one of the “Four Musketeers”, one of four great Frenchmen playing pro tennis alongside Bill Tilden in that era.

How do you play like a crocodile?  According to Lacoste, you hang on in any situation and devour your opponent.  Lacoste gained the nickname “Le Crocodile” after winning a bet and an alligator-skin suitcase from the captain of the French Davis Cup team.   This led the way to a clothing company with the crocodile insignia and the rest is history.

Rene Lacoste Crocodile

Rene "Le Crocodile" Lacoste

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4 Responses to The Sports Archives History Lesson – Tennis Great René “Le Crocodile” Lacoste

  1. Monex says:

    TENNIS LEGEND Ren Lacoste created a line of sport apparel using a crocodile for a logo. Now heres the false aspect of the legend – thats an alligator on the logo not a crocodile. Obviously in effect it really doesnt matter as alligator crocodile they both basically look the same and they dont work the name of the animal into the production of the clothes.

  2. Outstanding article…! I really love visiting your blog for the reason that you always give us informative articles. I enjoyed it once again.

  3. Pingback: The Sports Archives History Lesson – The Business of Sport – Fred Perry | The Sports Archives Blog

  4. Pingback: The Sports Archives – History Of The Game Of Tennis In The United States | The Sports Archives Blog

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